feminism, Gender Diversity, Gender Equality, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, Poetry, storytelling, women

Enough

black and white close up eyes face

Alone in the darkness
Drawn into gloom
In the quiet of night
She whispers “me too”

Only existing
An extension of him
Wanting her freedom
She curses his whim

Years of abuse, a
life mapped by bruises
Ignoring her struggle
He just makes excuses

Invisible scars
They mark her history
And trigger the slap,
his hand from her knee

And yet he says, ‘She’s
a little bit crazy’
Or is it she’s finally
had enough, maybe?

Stories of sisters
Encourage her too
In the bright of day
She now shouts “Me Too”

No longer irrelevant
She finds her power
Blooming through thick mud
A lotus flower

A wave of voices
together as one
Rippling outward
Echoing the sun

One voice, then another
Many women vow,
supporting each other
Is he listening now?

And still he says, ‘She’s
a little bit crazy’
Or is it she’s finally
had enough, maybe?

He’s listening now
Does he really hear?
Will he ever understand
What it’s like being her?

And when he says, ‘She’s
a little bit crazy’
Will he finally know
She’s had enough, maybe?

And when he says, ‘She’s
a little bit crazy’
Will he finally know
She’s had enough, maybe?

gratitude, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, Poetry, storytelling, women

Lightness

sparks of firecracker

Sparklers shimmer
in the night

The sizzle and crack
mesmerize all
Aliveness dances
in dynamic starbursts

Her face glows
iridescent against
the dark backdrop
Angelic

The fire burns toward
its inevitable end
A pause,
another is lit

Sparklers shimmer
in the night

gratitude, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, Poetry, storytelling, women

Out Breath

green grass field and mountain

‘This may be the last time I see you.
I’m so glad you came.’
The trip was a whirlwind,
but of course we made it.

She was the same as I remembered,
a bit crass and a lot stubborn,
proud of the life she had made,
reminding us to focus on what matters.

‘Breathe the joys of life deep into your Self’
Family. Friends. Home.
‘Breathe out life’s expectations’
Title. Status. Money.

‘Does a fancy car or impressive title define you?
Are you what you have,
what you do?
Something else entirely, perhaps?’

The countryside, as we drove,
a pine tree blanket over lush hills,
exposed the river now and then,
signs of moose crossings dotted our path.

We never did see a moose,
but we did, for a brief time, get a window
into another world, one of simply living,
a reminder to focus on what matters.

We may not see her again.
She will be cherished, always reminding us,
‘Life is lived somewhere between
the in-breath and the out-breath.’

We’re so glad we went.

Gender Diversity, Gender Equality, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, women

Monthly Feature: What progressive looks like in gender equality: let’s go girls!

According to Stats Canada, women have outpaced men in university graduation since the 1990’s; this trend is projected to continue with more than 65% of university graduates currently women. Most fields, even in the 90’s, had more female than male graduates: health, law, social sciences, humanities, education, and business management. There are only three fields that still see fewer women than men graduate: math and computer science, architecture and engineering, and protective services; but less than 15% of all students graduate in these fields. Most of today’s leaders, even in the technology industry, come from a variety of educational backgrounds. There have been plenty of women in the pipeline since the early 90’s to identify, mentor, and promote into senior leadership and board positions.

So, what are the missing ingredients that have kept women out of the boardroom and executive ranks? Many will say it is confidence, acceptance, and support. Several organizations globally and locally are addressing this problem with young girls before they become university age; two such organizations are Technovation and ambiSHEous.

Technovation is a global technology entrepreneurship program that encourages young girls in middle school and high school to pursue technology and business fields. An annual challenge is run across more than 100 countries globally. Young girls work in teams to build a mobile app that solves a community problem, write a business plan that supports their idea, and pitch their start-up to a panel of judges. Professional women, who serve as impressive role models, mentor the girls as they work through the program. These amazing mentors often continue to support the girls throughout their future careers. Participating in Technovation Challenge gives young girls the increased confidence they need to pursue technology fields and to believe they can accomplish anything.

ambiSHEous is a local organization that was founded on the premise girls should be encouraged to lead early and should be, not only accepted, but honoured for their bold ambition. They combine entrepreneurship training, citizenship education, and leadership development to shape the ambitions of girls in a positive, world-changing way. Like Technovation, ambiSHEous knows that confidence is the result of skills, knowledge, and experience; which is why they focus on educating girls in financial literacy, entrepreneurship, civic engagement, and social change. They equip girls with the valuable skills, real-life know-how, and confidence they need to step forward and lead.

It is through global and local programs like Technovation and ambiSHEous that girls are developing the confidence they need to be future leaders. These types of programs are reminding young girls that it is perfectly acceptable to be bold and ambitious; and they are encouraging young girls to tackle tough world problems. As the pace of female university graduates continues to rise and as young girls acquire the much-needed confidence, acceptance, and support to be future leaders, it could very well be ‘Our Turn’.

feminism, Gender Diversity, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, women

Boys will be boys. And the women who love them.

I loved being the only woman in a room full of men. I played golf (not very well), shot pool, beat everyone (really!) at poker, organized beer nights, pointed out attractive women, and studied up on NFL, MLB, PGA, and NHL. I wore being ‘one of the guys’ like a badge of honour, until I realized that I was sacrificing my natural gifts to fit into a mold that wasn’t designed for me as a woman. You rarely hear guys saying ‘Man, I’d love to be ‘one of the girls!’. In fact, what I have heard, is other men say they’ll revoke a guy’s man card if he acknowledges his femininity.

Let’s save the topic of men embracing their feminine side for another day so we can focus on the masculine attributes that make working with men completely and utterly fantastic!

  • Men regularly say what they mean: Organizational politics aside, you usually don’t have to guess what a man is thinking. Men are more naturally assertive than women. They are comfortable saying what they think, so if they have something to share, they will say it directly with little concern for feelings. The result: fewer hidden agendas and little gossip.
  • Men tend not to hold grudges: Men can have aggressive arguments involving name-calling and cursing, and still toast a beer with each other later the same day. Because they have less concern for feelings, they get over conflict more readily (which is not to say the conflict is resolved).
  • Most men are amazingly bold, bordering on brazen: I am regularly flabbergasted at how confident men are in the skills they have, what they can achieve, and how easily they convince others of their value. I wish there was a pill women could take to get a dose of that confidence which is why I was thrilled when the byline for International Women’s Day 2017 was ‘Be Bold for a Change’.
  • Many men are naturally protective: Evolution is to thank for men being natural protectors. They can be counted on to take care of people and resolve issues that threaten an organization. Their protective tendencies are what make them very loyal to their friends, colleagues, and companies.

Men are easy to work with because their agenda is simple: take heed of their advice, get over conflict quickly, help them make their bold ideas a reality, let them protect their turf and stay loyal to their friends. The sweet spot will be when we can harness the power of these masculine traits and couple them with the feminine gifts that come naturally to women.

feminism, Gender Diversity, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, women

Monthly Feature: What Progressive Looks Like in Gender Equality.

Global research shows that gender balanced boards drive better results. Companies with the most women board directors had a 16% higher Return on Sales (ROS) than those with the least, and a 26% higher Return on Invested Capital (ROIC). And yet, less than 20% of board seats are held by women in Canada and the US.

Entrepreneurial women and progressive men are creating new organizations that promote women in business and technology, encourage young girls to enter STEM fields, protect women from sexually harassing environments, and prepare women for senior leadership roles and the board room.

One example of a company promoting women in business and technology is the global powerhouse: Work180. Starting in Australia as DCC Jobs, Work180 recently re-branded as they set their sight on the global market. This progressive recruiting firm’s main goal is to identify female-friendly businesses and recruit on their behalf. Corporations who understand the value of increasing female representation at all levels of an organization, across many industries, are flocking to Work180 to become certified as female-friendly and to attract more women.

Employers are pre-screened on a set of criteria including paid parental leave, pay equity, flexible working, professional development, and employee engagement. If a company meets the minimum criteria, they are advertised as ‘Work180 Certified’; the breadth of certified industries ranges from engineering to fashion. And with the support of companies like Microsoft Corporation, Optus, and BHP, the trend of women choosing female-friendly companies and companies choosing to create female-friendly environments is expected to evolve and disrupt.

Female leaders, entrepreneurs, mentors, and educators are coaching peers in industry and young girls everywhere to break out as entrepreneurs, to make sound business decisions, to stand up for their legal rights, and to look for evidence of female support before joining a company. The data is clear in demonstrating that businesses with more female representation at the board and senior executive levels drive better financial results. There are many examples of organizations like Work180 that make attracting and retaining women easier for female-friendly companies. And there is still more to come.

feminism, Gender Diversity, katharine griffiths, katharinegriffiths, women

Women and work. The confusion is real.

I joined the Women’s March this year with my husband and my daughter. My aunt, who was a pioneer for gender diversity in the financial industry, challenged the need for a Women’s March. She questioned what more is required to justify still marching.

In North America, women legally have the right to vote, the right to own property, the right to health and reproductive care, and the right to an education. I answered that we will need an annual Women’s March until the spirit of the law is honoured and until all women globally share the same fundamental rights.

Her passion for how easy women have it today made me curious about the pendulum swing of change associated with the role women have played in society. Throughout recent history women have swayed between taking care of the home and developing a career. From the late 19th century until the 1960’s, it seemed to be an either-or venture, and women who didn’t follow the societal norms of the time were often shunned by other women.

Women have had many more opportunities since the 1960’s to choose their own path. The naming of 2018 as ‘Year of the Woman’ feels a bit redundant since 1992 shared the same honour, but I expect that 2018 will be different. Both men and women are no longer falling by default into traditional roles, and many industries are applying conscious effort to implement diversity agendas. It helps that investment firms, the financial industry, and government organizations are holding corporations accountable for hitting gender diversity targets. Change is happening.

Women are a driving force behind the push for gender diversity. My hope is that this is the final wave of feminism; as the gender equality agenda becomes the norm across every level of every industry globally, the need for a feminist movement will expire. We’ll all just be equal, and those wonderful attributes that make men and women different will be embraced.